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How Plato can help us redefine campaigning

How Plato can help us redefine campaigning

We all know that campaigning has been going through a bit of a rough patch, with the lobbying act and all. However, I was still taken aback when someone referred to campaigning as the “C” word. A little strong, maybe. However, as I go round the country talking to people as part of the foundation’s Social Change Project, it becomes increasingly clear just how much of a problem language can be.

SMK TeamHow Plato can help us redefine campaigning
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Three books signal new interest in social action

Three books signal new interest in social action

In a new report from the innovation foundation Nesta, called We Change the World: How Social Movements Influence Health and Wellbeing, I argue that campaigning is more an art than a science. I point out that there is no fixed model, no curriculum, no rules and no guarantee. Furthermore, I say that campaigning is about reading power and understanding where change might come from.

Sue TibballsThree books signal new interest in social action
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Guest blog: Top 10 Campaigning Tips: Insights from an ex-civil servant

Guest blog: Top 10 Campaigning Tips: Insights from an ex-civil servant

Having previously been a civil society advocate and campaigner, I often wondered what the most successful tactics were to influence policymakers. I then took up a job in the civil service in environmental policy, and for the past few years I had the opportunity to see what civil society advocacy looks like from the ‘other side’ – in government. 

AnonymousGuest blog: Top 10 Campaigning Tips: Insights from an ex-civil servant
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Guest blog: Politics has just got interesting again

Guest blog: Politics has just got interesting again

With Parliament in recess it’s a good time for policy wonks and campaigners to reflect on the year just gone – and the year ahead. And looking back, what a year its been: if nothing else, politics has started to get interesting again.

In the short term, the recent election may not have changed much on the ground, but it was certainly a sign that the public mood is shifting. A warning shot across the bows of austerity  – with public services now all too clearly struggling and the deficit still growing,  people are asking if the very real pain is worth the ever-receding gain of a budget surplus.  Add to this the continued uncertainty over Brexit, and the deep divisions within both the main political parties on this issue – as well as in the country as a whole, and the future looks as clear as mud.

Belinda PrattenGuest blog: Politics has just got interesting again
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Guest blog: Raising our game – lessons for social change campaigners from the EU referendum

Guest blog: Raising our game – lessons for social change campaigners from the EU referendum

A year on from the EU referendum, I want to offer some reflections on the Remain campaign, why it lost and the lessons those of us engaged in campaigning for social change can take from the experience.

Twelve months ago, I woke up to the news I’d been dreading for months – the UK had voted to leave the European Union. In the run-up to the referendum my partner and I would regularly turn to each other and say, ‘We’re going to lose this, aren’t we?’, usually after hearing a politician or commentator talking about the referendum in terms we believed wouldn’t connect with a lot of people.

Emma TaggartGuest blog: Raising our game – lessons for social change campaigners from the EU referendum
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Guest blog: Carry On Campaigning

Guest blog: Carry On Campaigning

Rumours are swirling that charities have been silenced by the Lobbying Act during the election period, prevented from speaking out in support of their beneficiaries or cause. The Guardian, for example, reports that ‘sector leaders feel muzzled’ by the Act. But while it has undoubtedly helped to create a ‘chilling climate’ for campaigning, its impact must not be exaggerated: charities should – indeed must – carry on campaigning.

Belinda PrattenGuest blog: Carry On Campaigning
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Government should be clearer on charities and campaigning

Government should be clearer on charities and campaigning

With three recent reports saying that campaigning is a central function of charities, it’s time for clarity on the attitude of government, says our columnist

Three major reports about the voluntary sector have appeared in recent weeks: one from the House of Lords Select Committee on Charities; another from the Lloyds Bank Foundation; and the third from the sector think tank Civil Exchange. All look at the challenges facing charities and all are emphatic on one point: the absolute centrality of campaigning for charities and other voluntary sector organisations.

Sue TibballsGovernment should be clearer on charities and campaigning
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Don’t design campaigns to fit evaluation models

Don’t design campaigns to fit evaluation models

Measurement and evaluation is often a fraught business, particularly when the things being evaluated are as complex as campaigns. I remember Jim Coe, a campaign consultant, telling me that the best tools for evaluating a campaign are a pen and a piece of paper. In other words, there is no model or fixed approach that can just be rolled in.

Professional campaigners are under a lot of pressure to demonstrate their impact and prove their return on investment. They often have to set targets and milestones, and show a whole linear journey that can demonstrate that their campaign has achieved what it set out to do. For campaigns aimed at achieving a change in policy or law, this can be relatively straightforward. For campaigns to change attitudes or behaviour, this is much more difficult. As a result, much campaigning is now focused on that which can be measured.

Sue TibballsDon’t design campaigns to fit evaluation models
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Lessons from east Africa

Lessons from east Africa

The chief executive of the Sheila McKechnie Foundation reports from her trip to another continent.

I am writing this from a warm and fragrant Nairobi garden. The Sheila McKechnie Foundation is here in Kenya delivering advocacy training to children’s rights organisations from all over east Africa. The difference in their local contexts is, of course, profoundly different from the context here in the UK. The people we are training are working to prevent high incidences of child marriage and female genital mutilation, and to stop children being recruited into the militia, left to live on the streets or forced into domestic labour.

Sue TibballsLessons from east Africa
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We need strong leaders. Why not campaigners?

It has become a platitude to say that we live in increasingly complex and unpredictable times. In this “age of anxiety” that such a climate is creating, we need really strong leadership like we’ve never needed it before.

As the author and strategy consultant Robert Phillips says, we need leaders who can “actively embrace complexity and dissent; transform old, rigid, super-tanker organisations into open and adaptive social movements; and make themselves vulnerable and accountable to the many, not the few; to campaign together, in new and sometimes surprising coalitions, for public value and the common good”.

Sue TibballsWe need strong leaders. Why not campaigners?
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