Sue Tibballs

Sue Tibballs

Sue Tibballs is a campaigner, strategist and commentator who has worked at the forefront of the social change sector for over twenty years.

Could charities have swung the vote behind the European Union?

Charities still retain huge levels of trust, but were constrained during the referendum by narrow advice from the Charity Commission, writes our columnist.

Brexit. As in a game of Jenga, the British people have pulled a block out from the base of British politics and everything is tumbling. The political establishment is frantically try to re-establish order. Extraordinary times.

What part have charities played in all of this, if any? Or more appositely, what part could charities have played in all of this?

Sue TibballsCould charities have swung the vote behind the European Union?
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The government might learn from EU debate

Encouraging charities to campaign is crucial as the whole concept of the big society was surely about that, argues the chief executive.

It has been quite a time in the world of campaigning. The government has been in campaigning mode in recent months, with huge amounts of public money being directed at keeping the UK in the EU.

Sue TibballsThe government might learn from EU debate
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Where are the females in the campaigning canon?!

Since joining the Sheila McKechnie Foundation in January, I have been reading the various books and guides on how to campaign. I’ve been surprised by how many are written by people who have campaigned chiefly in the green movement, and for Greenpeace in particular. I have just finished reading the new edition of Chris Rose’s How To Win Campaigns, for example. It gives excellent advice and has some great stories drawn from Chris’s front-line – and highly successful – career in green activism. And yet, to someone who has spent most of her career in the women’s movement, it also feels like some aspects of my experience are missing.

Sue TibballsWhere are the females in the campaigning canon?!
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It’s our campaigning that sustains the third sector!

Our columnist was taken aback when someone suggested the most interesting campaigns are no longer coming from the charity sector.

At a voluntary sector event in Scotland last month, someone said to me that “the most interesting campaigns today are not coming from the charity sector”. I was taken aback. Haven’t charities always been at the vanguard of social campaigning?

Sue TibballsIt’s our campaigning that sustains the third sector!
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A climate of fear that is damaging campaigning

The chief executive of a large grant-giving trust recently told me that the various government measures aimed at further regulating the charity sector were influencing the funding decisions of his trust and others. The bark of these measures might be worse than their bite, he said, but they were creating a climate of fear that was causing funders to contract.

He also said: “It feels like the politicians had expenses; the bankers had Libor; the media had hacking – so now it is the charity sector’s turn.” As if corruption in society is endemic and, look, even the charity sector is at it too! But what strikes me is that our crimes are not of the same order. We are under pressure for paying senior management too much, for over-aggressive fundraising and for being, well, just too big and well off. Some legitimate questions are raised, but none of them is in the same league as the other practices outlined above: the first one is in clear breach of the rules; the last two are illegal.

Sue TibballsA climate of fear that is damaging campaigning
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Changing attitudes is as vital as probing policy

A narrow interpretation of campaigning does no good for anyone in civil society, writes our columnist

What do you understand by the term “to campaign”? I’ve always understood it to mean to bring about change in a broad sense, and seen campaigns as trying to change everything from attitudes and behaviour to cultural norms, policy and law. But I’m struck by a trend in our sector to equate campaigning more narrowly with policy and advocacy.

Sue TibballsChanging attitudes is as vital as probing policy
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